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Colleges 2005

Statistics from the 2005 America’s Best Colleges
by U.S. News & World Report for 2003-04 freshman class.

school % accepted total applicants number accepted % Asian-Am. in student body
Juilliard School 6.80 1824 124 11*
U.S. Coast Guard Academy 7.12 6028 429 5
Harvard 9.98 20,987 2095 16*
Princeton 10.18 15,726 1601 13
U.S. Military Academy 10.36 12,688 1314 7
U.S. Naval Academy 10.49 14,101 1479 4
Columbia 11.22 14,648 1643 16
Yale 11.36 17,735 2014 13
Cooper Union 12.22 2414 295 25
Stanford 12.58 18,628 2343 25
U.S. Air Force Academy 14.91 13,068 1948 5
Brown 16.11 15,157 2442 14
MIT 16.48 10,549 1735 28
CalTech 16.93 3071 520 31
Amherst 17.78 5631 1001 12
Dartmouth 18.18 11,855 2155 12
Washington Univ. (St. Louis) 20.02 20,378 4080 9*
U. of Pennsylvania 20.38 18,831 3837 17*
Pomona 21.08 4539 957 13
Williams 21.21 5341 1133 9
Georgetown 22.73 15,420 3505 10
Middlebury 23.28 5468 1273 7
U. of Calif. – Los Angeles 23.52 44,994 10,581 38
Swarthmore 23.54 3908 920 16
U. of Calif. – Berkeley 23.89 36,976 8832 41*
Average 15.9

*decrease from prior year

 

http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Admission/gettoknowus/factsandfigures.html

Brown University Admissions: Facts and Figures
Admission Statistics for the Class of 2008

Distribution of College Board Test Scores (Verbal)

Applied Admitted Percent
Admitted
Enrolled
750-800 3,359 904 26.9% 424
700-740 3,639 627 17.2% 330
650-690 3,184 415 13% 277
600-640 2,271 276 12.2% 194
550-590 1,004 117 11.7% 85
500-540 500 51 10.2% 37
450-490 216 19 8.8% 16
< 450 110 7 6.4% 4
No CEEB Scores 1,003 88 8% 62
Total 15,286 2,504 16.4% 1,429

Distribution of College Board Test Scores (Math)

Applied Admitted Percent
Admitted
Enrolled
750-800 3,389 884 26.1% 396
700-740 4,185 744 17.8% 429
650-690 3,326 422 12.7% 273
600-640 1,905 226 11.9% 161
550-590 883 88 10% 67
500-540 386 37 9.6% 29
450-490 142 13 9.2% 10
< 450 67 2 3% 2
No CEEB Scores 1,003 88 8.8% 62
Total 15,286 2,504 16.4% 1,429

 

5/11/04 The Dartmouth: “Admittance rates differ drastically by race for Class of 2008,”
Dartmouth accepted 44.6 percent of African Americans who applied — 2.5 times higher than the overall rate of 18.3 percent. Native Americans were accepted at 34.6 percent and Latinos at 29 percent. White students, on the other hand, had a more difficult time getting accepted; only 16.2 percent of white, non-international students received letters of acceptance.
Dean of Admissions Karl Furstenberg cited two reasons for the higher acceptance rates. First, the College recruits minority populations aggressively, producing “a very well cultivated applicant pool,” he said. Second, Dartmouth and other prestigious institutions are competing for the same small pool of highly qualified minority students. The College has to accept more of them, therefore, to compensate for a lower yield.  “Its supply and demand,” Furstenberg said.
But not all minorities are receiving preference. The number of Asian American college applicants has grown substantially over the last decade, so that Asian Americans no longer receive a significant preference for being a minority sub-population. Asian Americans applying for the Class of 2008 at Dartmouth enjoyed just a four percent boost over the average applicant, being accepted at a rate of 22.8 percent.
This is partially attributable to the higher number of Asian American applicants compared to the other minority groups. A record 1,513 Asian Americans applied for a spot in the Class of 2008, compared to just 437 African Americans.
Michele Hernandez ’89, author of the book “A is for Admission,” and currently a private college consultant, noticed the disparity when she worked for the Dartmouth admissions office in the mid-1990s.
“Colleges count Asian Americans in the numbers of students of color, but Asians receive no preference in the admissions process. I can’t believe Asians aren’t outraged,” Hernandez said.
5/20/04 Harvard University Gazette: “College’s new financial aid initiative keeps yield near 80%,”
Harvard’s new financial aid initiative aimed at students from low and moderate economic backgrounds helped support close to an 80 percent yield on students admitted to the College Class of 2008 entering in September.
Yield, the percentage of admitted students who decide to accept an offer of admission, is considered a measure of a college’s competitiveness. Harvard’s yield remains, by a substantial margin, the highest of the nation’s selective colleges – particularly striking because students admitted under Harvard’s Early Action program are free to enroll at other colleges.
The current yield is slightly above last year’s 78 percent, allowing the Admissions Committee to admit only a small number from the waiting list this year. The yield is likely to rise by the time the committee makes its final selections in June.
The Class of 2008 was selected from a pool of 19,750 applicants, the second largest total in Harvard’s history. Last year’s record 20,987 reflected in part more liberal early admissions guidelines in force at a number of selective colleges, including Harvard.
Minority students did well in this year’s competition. Asian-American students will comprise 19.7 percent of the Class of 2008, compared to 18 percent last year. African-American students will comprise 9.2 percent of the Class (8.8 percent last year), Latino students 8.9 percent (8 percent last year), and Native Americans 1.1 percent (0.8 percent last year). While the yield on Asian-American students declined from 84.1 percent to 81.3 percent, the yields for other minority groups rose. The yield on African-American students increased from 66.5 percent to almost 70 percent; Latino students from 70.5 percent to 73.6 percent, and Native-American students from 60 percent to 94.4 percent.
A version of this article appeared in the 4/14/04 issue of MIT Tech Talk (Volume 48, Number 24): “Admissions Office numbers give glimpse of incoming class,”
The Admissions Office has released a numerical snapshot of the students who have been offered freshman admission as next fall’s Class of 2008. The numbers “highlight the extremely strong preparation of our students,” said Dean of Admissions Marilee Jones. “They are the best students of their generation and we hope they enroll.”
   
Applications
Class of 2008: 10,464
Class of 2007: 10,549

Number admitted
Class of 2008: 1,664
Class of 2007: 1,735

Percentage admitted
Class of 2008: 16%
Class of 2007: 16%

Targeted enrollment
Class of 2008: 1,020
Class of 2007: 1,000

Number wait-listed
Class of 2008: 597
Class of 2007: 491

Male:
Class of 2008: 897
Class of 2007: 885

Female
Class of 2008: 767
Class of 2007: 850

Percentage of women
Class of 2008: 46%
Class of 2007: 49%

Percentage of underrepresented minorities (African-American, Mexican-American/Chicano, Native American, Puerto Rican)
Class of 2008: 17%
Class of 2007: 17%

% of those who:
Had at least 1 800 on SATs (5 scores total)
Class of 2008: 43%
Class of 2007: 41%

Had at least 2 800s on SATs
Class of 2008: 24%
Class of 2007: 23%

Had at least 3 800s on SATs
Class of 2008: 10%
Class of 2007: 10%

SAT-I verbal (mean score)
Class of 2008: 724
Class of 2007: 721

SAT-I math (mean score)
Class of 2008: 759
Class of 2007: 760

Number of states and D.C. represented
Class of 2008: 51
Class of 2007: 51

Number of territories and foreign countries represented
Class of 2008: 61
Class of 2007: 59
12/8/04 Daily Pennsylvanian: “Early decision applications hit new record high”
With a general increase in application numbers, minority applications are also on the rise. The University received a record 128 applications from black applicants. Also among the minority student applicants are 149 Latinos and 857 Asians.

 

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