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John Kasich on Asian American Issues

See below for John Kasich’s positions on:

– Asian Pacific Americans the candidate has hired, appointed or supported for election
– Affirmative Action and Quotas
– Employment discrimination, glass ceilings
– Making English the official language of the U.S.
– Foreign Policy toward China, Taiwan, India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam .   Missile defense system to protect Japan, Taiwan, or South Korea
– Hate Crimes. Legislation increasing penalties for hate crimes.
– Immigration
– School Vouchers
– Voting rights and providing ballots in different languages.


Asian Pacific Americans the candidate has hired, appointed or supported for election

Ohio Asian American Pacific Islander Advisory Council
aapi.ohio.gov/members/index.stm

Declined to answer questionnaire from 80-20 Initiative
http://www.ohiodailyblog.com/content/kasich-snubs-influencial-asian-american-group-loses-endorsement-strickland

Employment discrimination, glass ceilings

No information

Affirmative Action and Quotas

Affirmative action OK via recruitment; not via quotas
Affirmative action is a positive concept when it means we recruit from all segments of our society, and give all Americans the equal opportunity to compete. It is positive when it means recruiting from Howard University as well as Harvard University. Affirmative action has a negative effect on our society when it means counting us like so many beans and dividing us into separate piles. The effect of which is to raise questions in people’s minds about the merits of individuals in quality jobs.
Source: Columbus (OH) Urban League Speech, May 17, 1999 , May 17, 1999

Voted YES on ending preferential treatment by race in college admissions.
HR 6, the Higher Education Amendments Act of 1997, would prohibit any post-secondary institution that participates in any program under the Higher Education Act from discriminating or granting any preferential treatment in admission based on race, sex, ethnicity, color or national origin.
Reference: Amendment introduced by Riggs, R-CA.; Bill HR 6 ; vote number 1998-133 on May 6, 1998

School Vouchers (Asian Americans can escape public school systems run by teachers’ unions and incompetent liberals)

Expanding School Choices: Ohio has quadrupled the number of available vouchers and increased the number of schools whose students are eligible for vouchers.
https://johnkasich.com/education/

Kasich has expressed his support for school choice. Ohio’s school voucher program, EdChoice, allows students in poorly performing school districts to attend private schools through government scholarships.[149] Kasich expanded the EdChoice program by increasing the number of available vouchers from 14,000 to 60,000 in two consecutive budgets.
https://ballotpedia.org/John_Kasich_presidential_campaign,_2016

Hate Crimes. Legislation increasing penalties for hate crimes.

No information

Immigration

In an interview on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” Kasich outlined how he would tackle immigration as president.
“Finish the wall and make it clear. Anybody that comes over that wall once we’ve done it, you’re going back. And to the 12 million that are here, you know, legalize them but make sure we don’t have any of the criminal element here. And have a guest worker program. I think the country can unite around that,” he said.
He has said that the immigrants who live in the U.S. illegally “contribute a lot” to the U.S., and while he would not prefer to make citizenship an option, he believes it should be on the table to help restart negotiations on the issue.
Kasich once supported a bill that would eliminate birthright citizenship – citizenship that is automatically granted to babies born in the U.S., even if they are born to undocumented parents – but he has backed away from that position during his campaign, saying, “I don’t think we need to go there.”
http://www.cbsnews.com/media/john-kasich-what-does-he-stand-for/3/

Allow undocumented immigrants to stay in the country legally. A path to citizenship is not preferable but may be part of compromise.
Speaking at a forum in Iowa in June, Kasich said that he believes undocumented immigrants who otherwise follow the law should be allowed to gain a legal status. The Ohio governor told the audience that he prefers a legal status that does not lead to citizenship, but said that a “path to citizenship” may be part of compromise talks. That is a change from his 2010 stance. Then, Kasich told the Columbus Dispatch that he opposed any legal status for undocumented residents and wanted to end the practice of granting U.S. citizenship to all children born in the country.
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/john-kasich-believe-candidate-stands-10-issues/

Voting rights and providing ballots in different languages.

No information

Making English the official language of the U.S.

Kasich co-sponsored legislation declaring English the official language of the U.S.
English Language Empowerment Act (H.R.123) 99-HR0123 on Jan 6, 1999

Foreign Policy. Like Americans of African, Cuban, Greek, Irish, Italian, Jewish, Mexican, and Polish descent, many APA’s are interested in American foreign policy toward the country of their ancestors.

U.S. policy toward China and Taiwan

In order to stand by our allies who feel threatened by China’s aggressive actions in the South China Sea, the U.S. must work with regional allies to significantly increase our military presence in region and ensure freedom of navigation for the $5.3 trillion in annual trade that passes through the Western Pacific. We must help Japan defend its territorial waters with advanced seabed acoustic sensors, anti-ship missiles and other defensive equipment. We must also forward deploy our Pacific combat commander to Guam and station additional Air Force and Marines Corps units in the Western Pacific where they can conduct regular joint regional amphibious landing exercises.
https://johnkasich.com/NationalSecurity/

He said that the U.S. should send an aircraft group to the South China Sea to “send…a little message” to the Chinese about building artificial islands in disputed waters.
http://www.cbsnews.com/media/john-kasich-what-does-he-stand-for/6/

At the fourth Republican primary debate on November 10, 2015, John Kasich expressed his support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal. He said “The TPP, it’s critical to us, not only for economic reasons and for jobs, because there are so many people who are connected to getting jobs because of trade, but it allows us to create not only economy alliances, but also potentially strategic alliances against the Chinese. They are not our enemy, but they are certainly not our friend.”
https://ballotpedia.org/John_Kasich_presidential_campaign,_2016

Voted YES on Permanent Normal Trade Relations with China.
Vote to give permanent Normal Trade Relations [NTR] status to China. Currently, NTR status for China is debated and voted on annually. The measure contains provisions designed to protect the United States from Chinese import surges and the administration would have to report annually on China’s compliance with the trade agreement. The bill establishes a commission to monitor human rights, labor standards and religious freedom in China.
Reference: Bill sponsored by Archer, R-TX; Bill HR 4444 ; vote number 2000-228 on May 24, 2000

U.S. policy toward India

No information

U.S. policy toward Japan

There is strength in numbers and consensus, but our allies feel neglected and abused. We must rebuild these critical relationships in order to better advance our national interests the leadership that produces much-needed global stability. Among other actions, this includes . . . . supporting our Pacific allies in the face of Chinese belligerence . . . . .
https://johnkasich.com/NationalSecurity/

At the fourth Republican primary debate on November 10, 2015, John Kasich expressed his support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal. He said “The TPP, it’s critical to us, not only for economic reasons and for jobs, because there are so many people who are connected to getting jobs because of trade, but it allows us to create not only economy alliances, but also potentially strategic alliances against the Chinese. They are not our enemy, but they are certainly not our friend.”
https://ballotpedia.org/John_Kasich_presidential_campaign,_2016

U.S. policy toward Korea

There is strength in numbers and consensus, but our allies feel neglected and abused. We must rebuild these critical relationships in order to better advance our national interests the leadership that produces much-needed global stability. Among other actions, this includes . . . . supporting our Pacific allies in the face of Chinese belligerence . . . .
https://johnkasich.com/NationalSecurity/

At the fourth Republican primary debate on November 10, 2015, John Kasich expressed his support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal. He said “The TPP, it’s critical to us, not only for economic reasons and for jobs, because there are so many people who are connected to getting jobs because of trade, but it allows us to create not only economy alliances, but also potentially strategic alliances against the Chinese. They are not our enemy, but they are certainly not our friend.”
https://ballotpedia.org/John_Kasich_presidential_campaign,_2016

Regarding Korean exports of steel: “I am for open trade, free trade, but I am for clamping down when the United States worker gets shafted because somebody is cheating on a trade agreement.”
7/16/15 Meet the Press
http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/politics/elections/2015/07/26/kasich-meet-the-press-transcript/30694159/

U.S. policy toward Vietnam

There is strength in numbers and consensus, but our allies feel neglected and abused. We must rebuild these critical relationships in order to better advance our national interests the leadership that produces much-needed global stability. Among other actions, this includes . . . . supporting our Pacific allies in the face of Chinese belligerence . . . . .
https://johnkasich.com/NationalSecurity/

Missile defense system to protect Japan, Taiwan, or South Korea

I’ll never forget sitting one Sunday morning in an Episcopal church, and for no good reason the minister started reading a letter from the bishops discussing why we shouldn’t put missiles in Europe. I stood straight up and left. I thought, What do these bishops know about missiles in Europe? Fact is, it was those very missiles in Europe that bolstered the historic negotiations that ultimately led to the tearing down of the Berlin Wall, but I didn’t walk out because the politics was all wrong. I walked out because right or wrong, it had no place in the church.
Source: Stand For Something, by John Kasich, p.165-166 , May 10, 2006

Vote to declare it to be the policy of the United States to deploy a national missile defense.
Reference: Bill introduced by Weldon, R-PA; Bill HR 4 ; vote number 1999-4 on Mar 18, 1999

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