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Jim Webb on Asian American Issues

webb2016.com

See below for Webb’s positions on:

– Asian Pacific Americans the candidate has hired, appointed or supported for election
– Affirmative Action and Quotas
– Employment discrimination, glass ceilings
– Making English the official language of the U.S.
– Foreign Policy toward China, Taiwan, India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam .   Missile defense system to protect Japan, Taiwan, or South Korea
– Hate Crimes. Legislation increasing penalties for hate crimes.
– Immigration
– School Vouchers
– Voting rights and providing ballots in different languages.


Asian Pacific Americans the candidate has hired, appointed or supported for election

webb2016.com: Jim has six children and lives in Northern Virginia with his wife, Hong Le Webb. He speaks Vietnamese and has done extensive pro bono work with the Vietnamese community dating from the late 1970s.

Jim Webb promised to help Hotaru Nakama Ferschke return to the U.S. after she was deported. Hotaru, a citizen of Japan, married Marine Sgt. Michael Ferschke by proxy. Shortly after they were married, Michael was killed in Iraq. Before his death, the couple decided to raise their son in America, but Hotaru was deported because “U.S. immigration law doesn’t recognize the marriage,” according to The Knoxville News Sentinel.
On December 22, 2010, Webb’s bill S.1774 – A bill for the relief of Hotaru Nakama Ferschke was signed into law.
ballotpedia.org/Jim_Webb_presidential_campaign,_2016

Employment discrimination, glass ceilings

Voted for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act to prevent employment discrimination against gays

Affirmative Action and Quotas

7/22/10 Wall Street Journal: “Diversity and the Myth of White Privilege: America still owes a debt to its black citizens, but government programs to help all ‘people of color’ are unfair. They should end”
by Jim Webb
Where should we go from here? Beyond our continuing obligation to assist those African-Americans still in need, government-directed diversity programs should end.
Nondiscrimination laws should be applied equally among all citizens, including those who happen to be white. The need for inclusiveness in our society is undeniable and irreversible, both in our markets and in our communities. Our government should be in the business of enabling opportunity for all, not in picking winners. It can do so by ensuring that artificial distinctions such as race do not determine outcomes.
wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748703724104575379630952309408

School Vouchers (Asian Americans can escape public school systems run by teachers’ unions and incompetent liberals)

In 2006 Senate campaign, opposed school vouchers

Hate Crimes. Legislation increasing penalties for hate crimes.

No info

Immigration

Immigration: Allow a path to citizenship after the border is secure. Support the DREAM Act.
Webb supports a possible path to citizenship for immigrants in the country illegally after the border is secure. In the U.S. Senate, he voted against the 2007 McCain-Kennedy immigration reform bill. A year later he supported a bill to expand and reinforce fencing along the United States’ southwest border. In 2010, Webb voted for the DREAM Act, which would have given legal status to undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. Webb called President Obama’s executive actions to waive deportation for some undocumented workers “legal” but also stated that he is “not a believer in executive orders.”
pbs.org/newshour/updates/jim-webb-believe-candidate-stands-10-issues/

Voting rights and providing ballots in different languages.

No info

Making English the official language of the U.S.

Voted YES on declaring English as the official language of the US government. (Jun 2007)

Foreign Policy. Like Americans of African, Cuban, Greek, Irish, Italian, Jewish, Mexican, and Polish descent, many APA’s are interested in American foreign policy toward the country of their ancestors.

U.S. policy toward China and Taiwan

Senator Webb is particularly alarmed over China’s aspirations in the South China Sea, which Beijing claims in nearly its entirety. “It is vitally in our national interest to communicate strongly with China when it takes expansionist moves in the South China Sea.” The dispute in the area could draw the Philippines, a treaty-ally, and other states like Taiwan and Vietnam into conflict with China.
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/jim-webbs-seven-point-plan-save-us-foreign-policy-13054

In an August 2012 op-ed, Webb wrote, “In truth, American vacillations have for years emboldened China. U.S. policy with respect to sovereignty issues in Asian-Pacific waters has been that we take no sides, that such matters must be settled peacefully among the parties involved. Smaller, weaker countries have repeatedly called for greater international involvement. …While America’s attention is distracted by the presidential campaign, all of East Asia is watching what the U.S. will do about Chinese actions in the South China Sea. They know a test when they see one. They are waiting to see whether America will live up to its uncomfortable but necessary role as the true guarantor of stability in East Asia, or whether the region will again be dominated by belligerence and intimidation.”
ballotpedia.org/Jim_Webb_presidential_campaign,_2016

U.S. policy toward India

Having widely traveled in Asia for decades, as Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee’s Asia – Pacific Subcommittee Mr. Webb was a leading voice in calling for the United States to re-engage in East Asia, meeting frequently with key national leaders throughout the region.

Voted YES on cooperating with India as a nuclear power. (Oct 2008)
http://www.ontheissues.org/Senate/James_Webb.htm

U.S. policy toward Japan

Having widely traveled in Asia for decades, as Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee’s Asia – Pacific Subcommittee Mr. Webb was a leading voice in calling for the United States to re-engage in East Asia, meeting frequently with key national leaders throughout the region.

Senator Webb stressed that Japan and the Philippines, two nations tied to American defense pacts, should be a “preeminent concern.”
Senator Webb articulated his view that China’s behavior in East and Southeast Asia warrants a robust American presence in the region. He noted the area’s uniquely precarious position, describing it as “the only place where the interests of China, Russia, and Japan intersect.” Here, Webb believes the United States can be a stabilizing influence while supporting a friendly Tokyo.
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/jim-webbs-seven-point-plan-save-us-foreign-policy-13054

U.S. policy toward Korea

Having widely traveled in Asia for decades, as Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee’s Asia – Pacific Subcommittee Mr. Webb was a leading voice in calling for the United States to re-engage in East Asia, meeting frequently with key national leaders throughout the region.

Voted for free trade agreements with Columbia, Panama and Korea in 2011
ballotpedia.org/Jim_Webb_presidential_campaign,_2016

In January 2003, Webb said, “I think North Korea is far more dangerous than Iraq because of several reasons. One is, their leader truly is nuts. Saddam Hussein is shrewd. [North Korean President] Kim Jong Il is crazy . . . he’s totally unpredictable. Second of all, North Korea is . . . within a stones throw of 37,000 American troops who are in fixed defensive positions. So our forces are truly at risk if something goes haywire. Thirdly, [Kim] has nukes. The situation in North Korea is, in my view, more dangerous than the situation in Iraq. That does not mean we need to be going to war with North Korea right now. It just calls into question why we are doing this in Iraq.”
ballotpedia.org/Jim_Webb_presidential_campaign,_2016

U.S. policy toward Vietnam

Having widely traveled in Asia for decades, as Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee’s Asia – Pacific Subcommittee Mr. Webb was a leading voice in calling for the United States to re-engage in East Asia, meeting frequently with key national leaders throughout the region.

Worked for years toward normalization of relations with Vietnam and leading the way in Burma.
ballotpedia.org/Jim_Webb_presidential_campaign,_2016

webb2016.com: Having widely traveled in Asia for decades, as Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee’s Asia – Pacific Subcommittee Jim was a leading voice in calling for the United States to re-engage in East Asia, meeting frequently with key national leaders throughout the region. In 2009, he led an historic visit to Burma, becoming the first American leader to visit that country in ten years, and opening up the dialogue that resulted in the re-establishment of relations between our two countries.

Missile defense system to protect Japan, Taiwan, or South Korea

No info.

Webb Statement: Revised Missile Defense Plan Makes Sound Strategic Sense
By: Jim Webb, Jr.
Date: Sept. 17, 2009
Location: Washington, DC

Senator Jim Webb (D-VA) today expressed his support for the Administration’s decision to adopt the recommendation of Secretary of Defense Gates and the Joint Chiefs of Staff for a new approach to missile defense in Europe.

“As one who has spent five years in the Pentagon, including time as Assistant Secretary of Defense and Secretary of the Navy, I believe that the revised plan developed by the Department of Defense is an appropriate step forward,” Webb said. Senator Webb was one of five Senators to vote against the Bush Administration’s 2007 proposal to deploy a missile defense system in Poland and the Czech Republic.

“The primary intent of this plan was to provide a system against potential Iranian missile systems,” said Webb. “As originally conceived, it was unnecessarily provocative of Russia while not properly addressing the threat from Iran. The revised plan reflects a better strategic approach on both fronts.”

Source: http://webb.senate.gov/newsroom/record.cfm?id=317999

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